Indian Journal of Dental Research

ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Year
: 2013  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 342--346

Detection of putative periodontopathic bacteria in type 1 diabetic and healthy children: A comparative study


Ponnudurai Arangannal1, Santoshkumari2, Padma Krishnan3, Mamta Harilal Nichani1, Mahalakshmi Krishnan4, Vishnurekha Chamarthi1 
1 Department of Paedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Bharath University, Pallikaranai, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India
2 Department of Paedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Bharath University, Pallikaranai; Department of Paedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Sri Venkateswara Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India
3 Department of Microbiology, Dr. A.L.M. PG Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Taramani, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India
4 Department of Microbiology, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Bharath University, Pallikaranai, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Mahalakshmi Krishnan
Department of Microbiology, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Bharath University, Pallikaranai, Chennai, Tamilnadu
India

Aim: The aim of this study was to compare and assess the risk of periodontitis due to the presence of four putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) in type 1 diabetic and healthy children. Materials and Methods: Fifty type 1 diabetic and 50 healthy children in the age group of 7-14 years were recruited for the study. Subgingival plaque samples collected from permanent first molars were subjected to polymerase chain reaction assay to detect 16S rRNA gene of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, T. denticola and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data were analyzed using Fisher exact test. The P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The prevalence of subgingival periodontal pathogens in diabetic and healthy children was 2% and 4% for P. gingivalis, 34% and 34% for T. denticola, 20% and 18% for A. actinomycetemcomitans and for T. forsythia, 4% and 34%, respectively. Significant statistical difference was not observed with regard to the prevalence of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and A. actinomycetemcomitans among type 1 diabetic and healthy children (P = 1.00). Conversely, T. forsythia was less prevalent in diabetic children compared to healthy children. Conclusion: Statistical significance was not observed for the prevalence of periodontopathic bacteria in type 1 diabetic subjects. The results of the present study thus reveal the absence of risk of periodontitis by these bacterial species in type 1 diabetic subjects.


How to cite this article:
Arangannal P, Santoshkumari, Krishnan P, Nichani MH, Krishnan M, Chamarthi V. Detection of putative periodontopathic bacteria in type 1 diabetic and healthy children: A comparative study.Indian J Dent Res 2013;24:342-346


How to cite this URL:
Arangannal P, Santoshkumari, Krishnan P, Nichani MH, Krishnan M, Chamarthi V. Detection of putative periodontopathic bacteria in type 1 diabetic and healthy children: A comparative study. Indian J Dent Res [serial online] 2013 [cited 2021 May 12 ];24:342-346
Available from: https://www.ijdr.in/article.asp?issn=0970-9290;year=2013;volume=24;issue=3;spage=342;epage=346;aulast=Arangannal;type=0