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ORIGINAL RESEARCH Table of Contents   
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 526-530
Impact of dental operating microscope, selective dentin removal and cone beam computed tomography on detection of second mesiobuccal canal in maxillary molars: A clinical study


1 Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Sri Ramachandra Institute of Higher Education and Research (Deemed to be University), Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Thai Moogambigai Dental College and Hospital, Dr. MGR Educational and Research Institute (Deemed to be University), Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Angambakkam Rajasekaran Pradeep Kumar
Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Thai Moogambigai Dental College & Hospital, Dr. MGR Educational and Research Institute (Deemed to be University), Chennai - 600 095, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_353_20

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Introduction: Maxillary molars may frequently require root canal therapy and can have complex anatomy. It is important to locate and treat the second mesiobuccal canal to significantly improve prognosis. Aim of the Study: The purpose of this study was to evaluate direct vision, dental operating microscope (DOM), selective dentin removal under DOM, and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in clinical detection of second mesiobuccal root canal (MB2) in maxillary molars. Materials and Methods: A total of 122 maxillary first and second molars indicated for root canal treatment were included in our study. Following access cavity preparation, the presence of MB2 canal orifice was assessed in four stages. Stage I: with direct vision. Stage II: under DOM, Stage III: after selective dentin removal under DOM and Stage IV: teeth in which MB2 canal was not identified by Stage III were further investigated with CBCT. The number of canals identified during each stage was analyzed statistically. Results: Clinical detection of MB2 canal in our study was 90%, with 93% in maxillary first molar and 86% in maxillary second molar. 64% MB2 canals were located at Stage I (direct vision) which improved to 84% at Stage II (under DOM) and 90% at Stage III (selective dentin removal under DOM). CBCT investigation (Stage IV) further improved the identification of MB2 canal leading to overall prevalence of 93%. Conclusion: The results of our study demonstrated that MB2 canal can be clinically detected in up to 90% of maxillary molars by the use of DOM and selective dentin removal. CBCT investigation is indicated when MB2 canals are not clinically detected.


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