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ORIGINAL RESEARCH Table of Contents   
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 507-513
Prevalence of hyperglycemia and risk factors for orodental disease in Nigeria: Implications of opportunistic screening


1 School of Community Health, Charles Sturt University, NSW, Australia
2 School of Community Health, Charles Sturt University, NSW, Australia; Department of Public and Community Health, Novena University, Kwale, Nigeria
3 School of Biomedical Sciences, Charles Sturt University, NSW, Australia
4 Department of Biochemistry, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria
5 Dental Clinic, Eku Baptist Government Hospital, Eku, Delta State, Nigeria
6 School of Psychological and Clinical Sciences, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia
7 Department of Public and Community Health, Novena University, Kwale, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Ezekiel Uba Nwose
School of Community Health, 346 Leeds Parade, Charles Sturt University, Orange, NSW 2800, Australia

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_304_17

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Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with complications and orodental disease. Whether screening for DM during orodental health visits is a potential option is yet to be established in Nigeria. This study aims at assessing the prevalence of hyperglycemia in orodental disease as a clinical scenario to capitalize for opportunistic screening. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken in Catholic Hospital Abbi for Ndokwa communities and dental clinic of Eku Baptist Government Hospital, all in Nigeria. However, 474 individuals (433 community-based and 41 dental clinic-based) including 10 orodental cases were screened for hyperglycemia and waist-hip circumference indices. Blood lipid profiles were also performed. Based on fasting blood glucose levels, participants were grouped into non-diabetic (n = 172), prediabetic (n = 168), and diabetic (n = 78). A World Health Organization questionnaire on oral health was used to collect information on orodental disease risk factors. Data were analyzed with IBM SPSS 22 statistical package. Results: In the community-based cohort, the prevalence of hyperglycemia was 56.8%, including 38.8% prediabetes and 18.0% undiagnosed DM (UDM). In the dental-based group, 63.4% were hyperglycemic including 53.7% prediabetes and 9.7% UDM. There was significant difference (P < 0.05) in the ages of the participants in relation to glycemic status, with 17–29 years having the highest prevalence of UDM. However, 42.5% of the community-based clients had indication(s) of orodental disease. Conclusion: This is probably the first study to highlight higher prevalence of hyperglycemia from screening at a dental setting compared to general clinic. Opportunistic screening of DM in dental settings may be an option to consider during clients' orodental health visits.


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