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ORIGINAL RESEARCH Table of Contents   
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 106-111
Oral submucous fibrosis: A clinico-histopathological study in Chennai


1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, SDM Collage of Dental Science and Hospital, Sattur, Dharwad - 580 007, India
2 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Ragas Dental Collage and Hospital, Chennai, India

Correspondence Address:
K Kiran Kumar
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, SDM Collage of Dental Science and Hospital, Sattur, Dharwad - 580 007
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-9290.33785

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Background: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a precancerous condition associated with the use of areca nut in various forms. There are very few reports to correlate the clinical stage to histopathological grading in OSF. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based study was conducted on 75 OSF cases who visited our hospital in Chennai from 2000-2003. A detailed history of each patient was recorded along with a clinical examination. Biopsy was performed for histopathological correlation. Clinical stage of the disease in terms of the ability to open one's mouth was correlated with histopathological grading. Results: The male to female ratio of OSF cases was 6:1. All forms of areca nut products were associated with OSF. Chewing of paanmasala was associated with early presentation of OSF as compared to chewing of the betel nut. Out of 57 cases, which were in clinical stage II, 91.2% had histological grading of I and II in equal proportions and 8.8% had histological grade III. Out of 13 cases that showed a clinical stage of III, 52% showed a histological grade of II, 40% grade III and 8% grade I. Conclusion: In the present study, there was no direct correlation between clinical stages and histopathological grading. The possibility of difference in the severity and extent of fibrosis in different regions of the oral mucosa and involved muscles were considered as contributory factors for this variation.


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