Indian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental Research
HOME | ABOUT US | EDITORIAL BOARD | AHEAD OF PRINT | CURRENT ISSUE | ARCHIVES | INSTRUCTIONS | SUBSCRIBE | ADVERTISE | CONTACT
Indian Journal of Dental Research   Login   |  Users online: 475

Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size         

 


 
GUEST EDITORIAL Table of Contents   
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 47
Medical ethics


General, Vascular, and Laparoscopic Surgeon; Emeritus Professor, The TN Dr. MGR Medical University; Medical Director, Sri Jayendra Saraswathi Institute of Medical Sciences; President, TN Medical Practitioners' Association, India

Click here for correspondence address and email
 

How to cite this article:
Reddy C. Medical ethics. Indian J Dent Res 2007;18:47

How to cite this URL:
Reddy C. Medical ethics. Indian J Dent Res [serial online] 2007 [cited 2020 Oct 31];18:47. Available from: https://www.ijdr.in/text.asp?2007/18/2/47/32418
The recent increase of litigations against doctors is an issue of immediate concern. The reasons for this are social, economic, professional and judicial.

Social factors include increasing media awareness about the medical facts and fallacies, professional accountability, rights of patients in terms of information, decision-making, assessing the outcome (also known as consumerism) and the like. Negative publicity in the media about the profession has further done its share of damage. Economic aspects include proliferation of the private sector in healthcare, widening of the gap between government versus private establishments in terms of infrastructure and making the private hospitals inaccessible to the common man. Growing commercialization of medical education has become a necessary evil of the developing countries, as the available facilities for medical education have always fallen short of the demands. From a professional viewpoint, sophisticated/ foolproof gadgets and precise training are a must to feed the rapidly expanding medical science and craft. The entry of corporate/ multispeciality concept in private Medicare is another recent phenomenon in India. This often creates a situation of choosing the doctor not by preference but by chance, depending upon which day of the week one lands up in these hospitals, weakening the bonds of personal attachment or rapport. Coming to the judicial aspect, health is being interpreted as a fundamental right and any infringement by profession or state is viewed seriously. This has escalated the litigating tendencies of the public and strained the doctor-patient relations, since each client had to be treated as a potential litigant and in the bargain, leading to the practice of defensive medicine, including carrying out remotely useful investigations, spending on voluminous records and subscribing large sums for medical indemnity coverage. This has gradually drifted the importance from systematic clinical medicine to advising investigations.

The silver lining to this situation is that a vast majority of patients still have firm faith in their doctors and are not inclined to question their wisdom. Further, in the instance of a complaint against any qualified registered practitioner, the Indian law presumes that he/she would have done it right and the burden of proof of 'something went wrong' rests with the plaintiff. Also over 95% of cases filed in the consumer fora against doctors are being dismissed as not negligent or not proved.

The need of the time is thus a strong resolve to observe the code of ethics, to maintain a high order of professionalism and to pass on with pride, a healthy environment of medical practice to the next generation. Improving communication skills and transparency, proper documentation, respect for co-practitioners, adequate training before and after qualification, attending CMEs and a more active role by the medical council are some suggestions for further progress in this direction.

CMK Reddy

Top
Correspondence Address:
CMK Reddy
General, Vascular, and Laparoscopic Surgeon; Emeritus Professor, The TN Dr. MGR Medical University; Medical Director, Sri Jayendra Saraswathi Institute of Medical Sciences; President, TN Medical Practitioners' Association
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-9290.32418

Rights and Permissions


    Figures

  [Figure - 1]

This article has been cited by
1 Practice of code of ethics and associated factors among medical doctors in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Mesafint Abeje Tiruneh,Birhanu Teshome Ayele,Ellen Idler
PLOS ONE. 2018; 13(8): e0201020
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
2 Practice of code of ethics and associated factors among medical doctors in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Mesafint Abeje Tiruneh,Birhanu Teshome Ayele,Ellen Idler
PLOS ONE. 2018; 13(8): e0201020
[Pubmed] | [DOI]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
 
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  
 


    Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3039    
    Printed127    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded337    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal