Indian Journal of Dental Research

EDITORIAL
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 567-

Oral health-care access and tobacco cessation


SM Balaji 
 Executive Editor, Indian Journal of Dental Research, Director and Consultant Maxillofacial Surgeon, Balaji Dental and Craniofacial Hospital, Teynampet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
S M Balaji
Executive Editor, Indian Journal of Dental Research, Director and Consultant Maxillofacial Surgeon, Balaji Dental and Craniofacial Hospital, Teynampet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
India




How to cite this article:
Balaji S M. Oral health-care access and tobacco cessation.Indian J Dent Res 2016;27:567-567


How to cite this URL:
Balaji S M. Oral health-care access and tobacco cessation. Indian J Dent Res [serial online] 2016 [cited 2017 May 25 ];27:567-567
Available from: http://www.ijdr.in/text.asp?2016/27/6/567/199586


Full Text

Oral health-care access and cessation of tobacco are two main factors that could largely influence the outcome of oral health. In a developing nation such as India, with huge population and a large burden of oral diseases, prevention and proper utilization of dental workforce would be the ideal way forward. To urgently improve the situation, all the available current health workers at grassroot level can be utilized. They shall be provided basic training to identify the crucial dental disorders – dental caries, periodontal pathology, precancerous states, and cancerous situation. They can be taught the basic methods of convincing the public to motivate and seek treatment. This when properly implemented would save valuable time for the resource-constrained dentists to treat more effectively, especially to target those who need treatment on an emergency basis. While there are no large-scale studies to validate the idea, few small-scale studies are in support of this approach.[1] However, there are other studies that stress on the need for proper training of these paramedical personnel, before they are employed in the community.[2]

The recent public health literature in Lancet describes the proper utilization of these trained health workers for detecting and referring patients suffering from depression in India.[3] If replicated for oral health-care delivery and tobacco cessation, the result would have a tremendous bearing on the oral health-care burden in India. Also, such an approach would be a better avenue for oral health research. I call upon the Indian dental research community to explore the possibilities in such preventive measures.

References

1Shwetha KM, Pallavi HN, Pushpanjali K. Dental care utilization by accredited social health activist and anganwadi workers in Chintamani Taluk, Karnataka. J Indian Assoc Public Health Dent 2016;14:135-8.
2Yadav K, Solanki J, Adyanthaya BR, Yadav O, Shavi GR, Yadav P. Primary health center approach for oral health related knowledge, attitude and practice among primary health care workers of Western India. J Dent Health Oral Disord Ther 2016;5:00150.
3Nadkarni A, Weobong B, Weiss HA, McCambridge J, Bhat B, Katti B, et al. Counselling for Alcohol Problems (CAP), a lay counsellor-delivered brief psychological treatment for harmful drinking in men, in primary care in India: A randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2016. pii: S0140-673631590-2.