Indian Journal of Dental Research

EDITORIAL
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 115-

Burden of oral diseases


SM Balaji 
 Executive Editor, Indian Journal of Dental Research, Director and Consultant Maxillofacial Surgeon, Balaji Dental and Craniofacial Hospital, Teynampet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
S M Balaji
Executive Editor, Indian Journal of Dental Research, Director and Consultant Maxillofacial Surgeon, Balaji Dental and Craniofacial Hospital, Teynampet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
India




How to cite this article:
Balaji S M. Burden of oral diseases.Indian J Dent Res 2016;27:115-115


How to cite this URL:
Balaji S M. Burden of oral diseases. Indian J Dent Res [serial online] 2016 [cited 2020 Sep 28 ];27:115-115
Available from: http://www.ijdr.in/text.asp?2016/27/2/115/183123


Full Text



In India, with increasing lifestyle disorders, change in dietary sugar component, and increasing consumption of sugary sodas and other oral deleterious habits such as tobacco and/or areca nut use, the burden of oral diseases is bound to increase. There exist several lacunae to identify, formulate, and implement policies in this regard. The first and foremost of this is nonavailability of Pan-Indian Oral Disease burden. The last report was more than a decade back. The report by the Indian National Commission on Macroeconomics and health forecasted that it is estimated that by 2015, India would have at least 623.1 million sufferers from dental decay and 362.48 million people will have moderate/severe gum diseases.[1]

On the other hand, by the end of 2014, India had 154,436 registered dentists serving 1.23 billion people. Government health sector has 5614 dentists.[2] These data indicate that the distribution of dentistry favors and fuels private dentistry at urban and rural areas. Still, many of the rural areas have abysmally low dentists to population ratio. The immediate needs are (1) need to assess scientifically valid assessment of oral disease burden, (2) to study the distribution of dental human power across the nation, and (3) to study factors that impeded dental visits, treatment, and maintenance of proper regular oral hygiene in Indian population. These data would form the basis of further shaping of future policy.

Indian dental researchers could meaningfully contribute for this assessment by employing newer, advanced diagnostic and survey tools. It is the policy makers who need to initiate and formulate the policies that are directed to promote such epidemiological data gathering measures. It is my sincere request that our members should join hands to strengthen all stakeholders' initiatives by contributing such endeavors on the basis of the concept of collective strength.

References

1Shah N. Oral and dental diseases: Causes, prevention and treatment strategies. In burden of disease in India. New Delhi: National Commission on Macroeconomics and Health Macroeconomics and Health; 2005. p. 275-98.
2National Health Profile 2015. New Delhi: Central Bureau of Health Intelligence, Directorate General of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Govt. of India; 2015. p. 200-5.