Indian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental Research
HOME | ABOUT US | EDITORIAL BOARD | AHEAD OF PRINT | CURRENT ISSUE | ARCHIVES | INSTRUCTIONS | SUBSCRIBE | ADVERTISE | CONTACT
Indian Journal of Dental Research   Login   |  Users online: 2114

Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size         

 


 
ORIGINAL RESEARCH Table of Contents   
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 653-658
The effect of thermocycling on fracture toughness and hardness of different core build up materials


1 Department of Prosthodontics, Dr. DY Patil Dental College and Hospital, Mahesh Nagar, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Prosthodontics, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
G S Shanthala
Department of Prosthodontics, Dr. DY Patil Dental College and Hospital, Mahesh Nagar, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-9290.127603

Rights and Permissions

Introduction: Core build up materials are routinely used to restore grossly decayed teeth and in the oral environment they are subjected to changes in the temperature due to consumption of hot and cold food. Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of thermocycling on the fracture toughness and hardness of 5 core build up materials. Materials and Methods: Fifteen specimens were prepared for each of the following materials: DPI alloy, Miracle-mix, Vitremer, Fuji II LC and Photocore. American Standard for Testing Materials guidelines were used for the preparation of single-edge notch, bar-shaped specimens. Ten specimens of each material were thermocycled for 2000 cycles and the other 5 specimens were not thermocycled (non-thermocycled group). All specimens were subjected to 3-point bending in a universal testing machine. The load at fracture was recorded and the fracture toughness (K IC ) was calculated. Vickers hardness test was conducted on the thermocycled and non-thermocycled group specimens. Results: Photocore had the highest mean K IC in both thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups. Miracle-mix demonstrated the lowest mean fracture toughness (K IC ) for both thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups. By applying Mann Whitney 'U' test the Vickers hardness value in all materials used in the study is highly superior in non-thermocycled group as compared to thermocycled group (P < 0.01). Non-thermocycled Photocore showed highest hardness values of 87.93. Vitremer had lowest hardness of 40.48 in thermocycled group. Conclusion: Thermocycling process negatively affected the fracture toughness and hardness of the core build-up materials.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article

 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
  Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
  Reader Comments
  Email Alert *
  Add to My List *
 
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2979    
    Printed38    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded172    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal