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ORIGINAL RESEARCH Table of Contents   
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 289-293
Prevalence of archaea in chronic periodontitis patients in an Indian population


1 Department of Periodontics, Alfarabi College of Dentistry, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Periodontics, P.M.N.M Dental College and Hospital, Bagalkot, India
3 Department of Endodontics, Amritha Institute of Dental Sciences, Cochin, India
4 Department of Periodontics, Kannur Dental College and Hospital, Kannur, India
5 Department of Endodontics, Alfarabi College of Dentistry, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Nipun Ashok
Department of Periodontics, Alfarabi College of Dentistry, Riyadh
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: This study was self funded by authors, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-9290.117988

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Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of archaea in the subgingival crevices of patients with chronic periodontitis in an Indian population. Materials and Methods: Thirty four chronic periodontitis patients and 16 healthy subjects were included in the study. Thirty four subgingival plaque samples were collected from chronic periodontitis patients, of which 17 samples were from deep pockets and 17 were from shallow pockets. Sixteen subgingival plaque samples were collected from healthy subjects. The presence of archaea in plaque samples was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Results: Prevalence of archaea in chronic periodontitis patients was 29.4% and in healthy subjects was 11.8%, which was not a statistically significant difference. However, prevalence of archaea, in deep periodontal pockets was 47.1%, in shallow periodontal pockets was 11.8% and in healthy sulcus was 12.5%, respectively. Thus, showing a statistically significant difference between prevalence of archaea in deep periodontal pockets (47.1%) and healthy sulcus (12.5%) and also between deep periodontal pockets (47.1%) and shallow pockets (11.8%), respectively. Conclusion: Archaea were detected commonly in severe periodontitis suggesting that these microorganisms might be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.


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