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CASE REPORT Table of Contents   
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 665-669
Alopecia areata of dental origin in a child


1 Department of Pedodontics, Saveetha University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Pedodontics, Sri Ramachandra Dental College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of Pedodontics, Tagore Dental College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
A Victor Samuel
Department of Pedodontics, Saveetha University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-9290.107386

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Alopecia areata (AA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that involves the hair follicle. Current evidence indicates that hair follicle inflammation in AA is caused by a T-cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism occurring in genetically predisposed individuals. AA has a reported incidence of 0.1%-0.2%, with a lifetime risk of 1.7%. It has also been found that AA accounts for roughly 2% of new dermatology outpatient cases in the US and the UK, 3.8% of cases in China and 6.7% of cases in Kuwait. Pediatric AA constitutes approximately 20% of all AA cases. AA affects males and females equally. The most common site to be affected is the scalp (90%). The face, eyebrows, eyelashes, beard, underarm hair, and pubic hair may be affected and, sometimes, even the entire body. AA requires combined therapy, involving topical or intralesional corticosteroids, immune therapy with diphenylcyclopropenone, and even psychotherapy. In some cases, treatment consists of simply eliminating the dental infectious process. This case report describes AA of dental origin in a 9-year-old girl, which resolved after management of the dental problem.


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