Indian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental Research
HOME | ABOUT US | EDITORIAL BOARD | AHEAD OF PRINT | CURRENT ISSUE | ARCHIVES | INSTRUCTIONS | SUBSCRIBE | ADVERTISE | CONTACT
Indian Journal of Dental Research   Login   |  Users online: 874

Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size         

 


 
REVIEW ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 529-536
Temporomandibular disorders and functional somatic syndromes: Deliberations for the dentist


Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, DA Pandu Memorial RV Dental College and Hospital, No. CA 37, 24th Main, JP Nagar I Phase, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
S Suma
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, DA Pandu Memorial RV Dental College and Hospital, No. CA 37, 24th Main, JP Nagar I Phase, Bangalore, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-9290.104965

Rights and Permissions

Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is an umbrella term for a collection of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and associated tissues. TMD is not a rare pathology for the dentist. The most common presenting symptom is pain, which causes the patient seek immediate treatment. Management is dictated by the cause. The most 'famed' causes include trauma, inflammation, aging, parafunctional habits, infections, neoplasms, and stress; and these are always considered in the differential diagnosis of TMJ pain. There are some less 'famed' causes of TMD, which are characterized by increased pain sensitivity due to psychosocial factors; these include myofascial pain syndrome and functional somatic syndromes (FSS) such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. They present with chronic pain, fatigue, disability, and impairment in ability to perform daily activities. A non-systematic search in the English literature revealed numerous studies describing the occurrence of TMD in these conditions, along with few other oral manifestations. TMD has been even considered to be a part of the FSS by some. In these patients, TMD remains a recurring problem, and adequate management cannot be achieved by traditional treatment protocols. Awareness of these conditions, with correct diagnosis and modification of management protocols accordingly, may resolve this problem.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article

 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
  Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
  Reader Comments
  Email Alert *
  Add to My List *
 
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6610    
    Printed497    
    Emailed16    
    PDF Downloaded235    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal