Indian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental Research
HOME | ABOUT US | EDITORIAL BOARD | AHEAD OF PRINT | CURRENT ISSUE | ARCHIVES | INSTRUCTIONS | SUBSCRIBE | ADVERTISE | CONTACT
Indian Journal of Dental Research   Login   |  Users online: 1406

Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size         

 


 
ORIGINAL RESEARCH Table of Contents   
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 71-76
Flexural strength and hardness of resins for interim fixed partial dentures


1 Department of Prosthodontics, KMCT Dental College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India
2 Department of Prosthodontics, Yenepoya Dental College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Liju Jacob Jo
Department of Prosthodontics, KMCT Dental College, Kozhikode, Kerala
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-9290.79992

Rights and Permissions

Context: Materials used for the fabrication of interim restorations must satisfy biological, esthetic, and functional needs. Strength and wear resistance are two important physical properties contributing to clinical efficiency. Aim: The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the flexural strength and hardness of five resins used for the fabrication of interim fixed partial dentures. Materials and Methods: Five groups containing ten specimens of each material were fabricated in customized brass split molds with dimensions 65×10×2.5 mm. The materials subjected to this study were Revotek LC™ (group RLC), Protemp II™ (group PSC), Acry-lux V™ with regular monomer (group AHC), Acry-lux V™ with self-cure monomer (group ASC), DPI™ self-cure tooth molding powder (group DSC). The specimens were polymerized according to the manufacturers' instructions and were evaluated for flexural strength using a universal testing machine and for hardness using a microhardness tester. Statistical Analysis: The mean of the five groups was compared using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and pair-wise comparison was done using Tukeys honesty significance difference (HSD) test. P≤.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Flexural test results showed that group AHC (79.8950 MPa) had the highest flexural strength followed, in descending order, by group PSC (77.9700 MPa), group ASC (63.7150 MPa), group RLC (58.8110 MPa), and group DSC (51.9840 MPa). Statistically, the difference was found to be highly significant among all the groups. The hardness tests showed that group AHC (17.6900 KHN) had the highest hardness value followed, in descending order, by group PSC (15.9400 KHN), group RLC (12.6000 KHN), group ASC (11.2500 KHN), and group DSC (8.7700 KHN). Statistically, the difference was found to be highly significant among all the groups. Conclusion: Group AHC, representing a heat-polymerizing resin, showed the highest flexural strength and hardness values as compared to auto-polymerizing resins and light-polymerizing resin.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article

 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
  Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
  Reader Comments
  Email Alert *
  Add to My List *
 
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed5698    
    Printed204    
    Emailed6    
    PDF Downloaded346    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 21    

Recommend this journal